Precancerous Skin Lesions and Skin Cancers

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The Warning Signs of Skin Cancer

Skin cancers -- including melanoma, basal cell carcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma -- often start as changes to your skin. They can be new growths or precancerous lesions -- changes that are not cancer but could become cancer over time. An estimated 40% to 50% of fair-skinned people who live to be 65 will develop at least one skin cancer. Learn to spot the early warning signs. Skin cancer can be cured if it's found and treated early.

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Actinic Keratosis (Solar Keratosis)

These small, scaly patches are caused by too much sun, and commonly occur on the head, neck, or hands, but can be found elsewhere. They can be an early warning sign of skin cancer, but it’s hard to tell whether a particular patch will continue to change over time and become cancerous. Most do not, but doctors recommend early treatment to prevent the development of squamous cell skin cancer.  Fair-skinned, blond, or red-haired people with blue or green eyes are most at risk.

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Actinic Cheilitis (Farmer's Lip)

Related to actinic keratosis, actinic cheilitis is a precancerous condition that usually appears on the lower lips. Scaly patches or persistent roughness of the lips may be present. Less common symptoms include swelling of the lip, loss of the sharp border between the lip and skin, and prominent lip lines. Actinic cheilitis may evolve into invasive squamous cell carcinoma if not treated.

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Cutaneous Horns

The cutaneous horn appears as a funnel-shaped growth that extends from a red base on the skin. It is composed of compacted keratin (the same protein in nails). It is a specialized type of actininc keratosis. The size and shape of the growth can vary considerably, but most are a few millimeters in length. Squamous cell carcinoma can be found at the base. It usually occurs in fair-skinned elderly adults with a history of significant sun exposure.

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When Is a Mole a Problem?

A mole (nevus) is a benign growth of melanocytes, cells that gives skin its color. Although very few moles become cancer, abnormal or atypical moles can develop into melanoma over time. "Normal" moles can appear flat or raised or may begin flat and become raised over time. The surface is typically smooth. Moles that may have changed into skin cancer are often irregularly shaped, contain many colors, and are larger than the size of a pencil eraser. Most moles develop in youth or young adulthood. It's unusual to acquire a mole in the adult years.

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Dysplastic Nevi (Atypical Moles)

Atypical moles are not cancer, but they can become cancer. They can be found in sun-exposed or sun-protected areas of the body. Atypical moles may be larger (one-quarter inch across or larger) and more irregular in shape, with notched or fading borders. They may be flat or raised or the surface smooth or rough. They are typically of mixed color, including pink, red, tan, and brown.

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Know Your ABCDEs

Most moles on a person's body look similar to one another. A mole or freckle that looks different from the others or that has any characteristics of the ABCDEs of melanoma should be checked by a dermatologist. It could be cancerous. The ABCDEs are important characteristics to consider when examining your moles or other skin growths, so learn them in the slides to come.

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Know Your ABCDEs: 'A' is for Asymmetry

Asymmetry means one half of a mole does not match the other half. Normal moles are symmetrical. When checking your moles or freckles, draw an imaginary line through the middle and compare the two halves. If they do not look the same on both sides, have it checked by a dermatologist.

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Know Your ABCDEs: 'B' is for Border

If the border or edges of the mole are ragged, blurred, or irregular, have it checked by a dermatologist. Melanoma lesions often have uneven borders.

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Know Your ABCDEs: 'C' is for Color

A mole that does not have the same color throughout or that has shades of tan, brown, black, blue, white, or red is suspicious. Normal moles are usually a single shade of color. A mole of many shades or that has lightened or darkened should be checked by a doctor.

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Know Your ABCDEs: 'D' is for Diameter

A mole is suspicious if the diameter is larger than the eraser of a pencil.

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Know Your ABCDEs: 'E' is for Evolving

A mole that is evolving – shrinking, growing larger, changing color, begins to itch or bleed – should be checked. If a portion of the mole appears newly elevated, or raised from the skin, have it looked at by a doctor. Melanoma lesions often grow in size or change in height rapidly.

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Tips for Screening Moles for Cancer

Examine your skin on a regular basis. A common location for melanoma in men is on the back, and in women, the lower leg. But check your entire body for moles or suspicious spots once a month. Start at your head and work your way down. Check the "hidden" areas: between fingers and toes, the groin, soles of the feet, the backs of the knees. Check your scalp and neck for moles. Use a handheld mirror or ask a family member to help you look at these areas. Be especially suspicious of a new mole. Take a photo of moles and date it to help you monitor them for change. Pay special attention to moles if you're a teen, pregnant, or going through menopause, times when your hormones may be surging.

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How Are Moles Evaluated?

If you find a mole or spot that has any ABCDE's of melanoma -- or one that's tender, itching, oozing, scaly, doesn't heal or has redness or swelling beyond the mole -- see a doctor. Your doctor may want to remove a tissue sample from the mole and biopsy it. If found to be cancerous, the entire mole and a rim of normal skin around it will be removed and the wound stitched closed. Additional treatment may be needed.

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A Primer on Skin Cancer

Malignant melanoma, especially in the later stages, is serious and treatment is difficult. Early diagnosis and treatment can increase the survival rate. Nonmelanoma skin cancers include basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Both are common and are almost always cured when found early and treated. People who've had skin cancer once are at risk for getting it again; they should get a checkup at least once a year.

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Melanoma

Melanoma is not as common as other types of skin cancer, but it's the most serious and potentially deadly. Possible signs of melanoma include a change in the appearance of a mole or pigmented area. Consult a doctor if a mole changes in size, shape, or color, has irregular edges, is more than one color, is asymmetrical, or itches, oozes, or bleeds.

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Squamous Cell Carcinoma

This nonmelanoma skin cancer may appear as a firm red nodule, a scaly growth that bleeds or develops a crust, or a sore that doesn't heal. It most often occurs on the nose, forehead, ears, lower lip, hands, and other sun-exposed areas of the body. Squamous cell carcinoma is curable if caught and treated early. If the skin cancer becomes more advanced, treatment will depend on the stage of cancer.

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Bowen Disease

Bowen disease is also called squamous cell carcinoma "in situ." It is a type of skin cancer that spreads outward on the surface of the skin. By contrast, "invasive" squamous cell carcinomas can grow inward and spread to the interior of the body. Bowen disease looks like scaly, reddish patches that may be crusted; it may be mistaken for rashes, eczema, fungus, or psoriasis.

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Basal Cell Carcinoma

Basal cell carcinoma is the most common and easiest-to-treat skin cancer. Because basal cell carcinoma spreads slowly, it occurs mostly in adults. Basal cell tumors can take on many forms, including a pearly white or waxy bump, often with visible blood vessels, on the ears, neck, or face. Tumors can also appear as a flat, scaly, flesh-colored or brown patch on the back or chest, or more rarely, a white, waxy scar.

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Less Common Skin Cancers

Uncommon types of skin cancer include Kaposi's sarcoma, mainly seen in people with weakened immune systems; sebaceous gland carcinoma, an aggressive cancer originating in the oil glands in the skin; and Merkel cell carcinoma, which is usually found on sun-exposed areas on the head, neck, arms, and legs but often spreads to other parts of the body.

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Who Gets Skin Cancer, and Why?

Sun exposure is the biggest cause of skin cancer. But it doesn't explain skin cancers that develop on skin not ordinarily exposed to sunlight. Exposure to environmental hazards, radiation treatment, and even heredity may play a role. Although anyone can get skin cancer, the risk is greatest for people who have:

  • Fair skin or light-colored eyes
  • An abundance of large and irregularly-shaped moles
  • A family history of skin cancer
  • A history of excessive sun exposure or blistering sunburns
  • Lived at high altitudes or with year-round sunshine
  • Received radiation treatments

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Reduce Your Risk of Skin Cancer

Limit your exposure to the sun's ultraviolet rays, especially between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., when the sun's rays are strongest. While outdoors, liberally apply a broad spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher (don't forget the lips and ears!), wear a hat and sunglasses, and cover up with clothing. And remember, if you notice changes to your skin such as a new growth, a mole changing appearance, or a sore that won't heal, see a doctor right way.

(Content Courtesy: WebMD)

Total Leucocyte Counts (TLC)

Total Leucocytes Count (White Blood Cell Count)

Leucocytes are white blood cells. These are of various types:

Neutrophils

Basophils

Eosinophils

Monocytes

Lymphocytes

These cells take part in defense system of our body. Deficiency of these cells causes various infections in our body like in AIDS patients. Lymphocytes are very low and such type of patients are prone to develop infections like tuberculosis, viral and fungal infections. if neutrophils are low, as in cancer patients on chemotherapy they are prone to develop bacterial and fungal infections. When leucocytes are low, we call it leucopenia. When leucocytes are high, we call it leukocytosis.

If you have low TLC then it is a dangerous condition because life threatening infections can occur in body leading to fatalities. Usually, it occurs in patients suffering from cancer especially when under chemotherapy infusions. Many Chemotherapy drugs can cause low TLC. SO, DO NOT RESORT TO SELF MEDICATION AND DO NOT TAKE MEDICINES PRESCRIBED BY NON TRAINED PERSONS IMPOSING AS DOCTORS.

Leucocytes are mainly of two types:
Neutrophil - these cells fight against bacteria and fungal organism.
Lymphocytes - these cells fight against virus and chronic infections like tuberculosis, leprosy.

In HIV patients lymphocytes are defective and number is less, this is the reason why such patients are prone to develop viral and tuberculosis infections. immuno-compromised patients like HIV patients, person on steroids, cancer patients, kidney transplant patients are also prone to develop cancer. Lymphocytes are having protective role in prevention of cancer, person having defect in lymphocytes is more prone to develop cancer. That is why in HIV patients incidences of cancer are very high.

TLC (total leucocytes count) can increase under many conditions. Stress is the main factor. Stress can be of many types. Infection because of any agent can increase TLC count. Trauma, physical exertion can also increase TLC count. BLOOD CANCER  and many other types of cancer can increase TLC. If you have persistently raised TLC, do not ignore it.

(Content Courtesy: Dr. Praveen Kumar Bansal, Director Oncology, Asian Institute of Medical Sciences, Faridabad).

ESR — ERYTHROCYTE SEDIMENTATION RATE

It is a well known investigation, routinely done by doctors. Normal value of ESR is up to 20 mm in hour. Increased ESR is indicative of inflammatory condition in body. Inflammatory conditions can be because of infections, auto immune disease and cancer. Infection, most common is tuberculosis, Rheumatoid arthritis, lymphoma, multiple myeloma. So, if you have raised ESR, DO NOT IGNORE IT CONSULT DOCTOR IMMEDIATELY.

INFLAMMATION

Localized physical condition in which a part of the body gets reddened, swollen, hot and often painful, especially as a reaction to injury or infection shall not be ignored as just another thing but needs to be investigated. It can occur anywhere in body, even in internal organs of body and you cannot see but you may have symptoms like fever, pain etc. In fact it is reaction of body against any wrong happening in our body. It has been seen that any inflammation occurring in body for long time can cause cancer like hepatitis, ulcerative colitis, persistent ulcer etc. If you have any symptoms of inflammation followed by fever, weight loss, pain and you have raised ESR persistently, kindly do not ignore it, consult a doctor immediately.

Inflammation is mainly caused by chemicals like interleukins, cytokines (produced by many body cells in various situations). Obesity is a condition which increases inflammation  by releasing these chemicals. This is the reason why obesity is not good for health. Physical exercise also increases  levels of these chemicals but due to some unknown reasons it acts in opposite way (reduced inflammation). This is the reason why physical exercise is good for health and also to prevent many diseases like cancer. Now a days yoga is very popular. It is good for mental status but it cannot replace physical exercise. TO INCRESE LIFE SPAN DO REGULAR PHYSICAL EXERCISES.

(Content Courtesy: Dr. Praveen Kumar Bansal, Director, Oncology, Asian Institute of Medical Sciences, Faridabad)

javed43

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One month has elapsed since Shama's critical cancer treatment has started. It is a long journey of approx. 24 months. It is very critical that this treatment continues till the time it is being prescribed, otherwise any sort of stoppage / hindrance would undo the medicines effects and could prove lethal for her. Hence, it is a humble request to all our well wishers to keep in touch and keep doing their bit so that this arduous journey of her treatment gets completed without any hiccups............. Thanks all the guys for being there.....

Shama4

Till recently I have been apprising everybody about my real life experiences in fighting this deadly disease. From today onwards I would like to make cancer take backstage and let me enjoy something which I like the most. I would like to unleash my passion and that is to dabble in Fashion Blogging. Encourage me to bring to fore the latest trends in Clothing, Accessories, Cosmetics, Fashion Trends, Healthcare etc.....

Fashion Trends That India Has Gifted To The World

India has given the world bountiful reasons for happiness: Bollywood, butter chicken and Bhangra are the first few that come to my mind. Film and food aside, the striking subcontinent has made a lasting mark on the global fashion scene. Let us explore the iconic gifts of style that India has given to the world with love.

The Jodhpur Trouser

       Jodhpur Trouser1       Jodhpur Trouser2

With humble origins in the traditional Indian churidaar pant, the Jodhpur trouser is now a fashion statement in its own right and the key reason behind the birth of the ‘Equestrian Chic’ trend. Indeed, an Indian polo player popularized these pants in Europe. They quickly became a must-have in every horseman and horsewoman’s wardrobe. Today, they are making waves across international runways and leading fashion magazines. I fell head-over-heels in love with Dolce and Gabbana’s silky rendition a few years ago.

The Maang Tikka

                Maang Tika4                   Maang Tika3

Once reserved only for the big fat Indian wedding, this sultry head accessory has absolutely skyrocketed in popularity, both in its home country and across the globe. In fact, Karl Lagerfeld was so inspired by this accessory that all of the models in the Chanel Pre-Fall 2012 show, aptly called ‘Paris-Bombay’, sported regal maang tikkas. And we all know that Karl can do no wrong, right?

The Bindi

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The spread of the bindi trend to the furthest corners of the world has not been without its fair share of controversy. Opponents of the trend believe that those who sport it are actually disrespecting the Indian culture where the bindi is worn by married woman to signify their commitment to their husbands. Right or wrong, this trend is here to stay as an important part of the bohemian music festival style. I’d love to know what your take is on this craze – fashion trend or blasphemy?

The Henna Tattoo

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Another ethnic bridal trend that has made it to the frontlines is the art of applying henna tattoos to hands in intricate designs. Popular with the artsy lot and bohemian babes, the henna tattoo trend has been spotted on many celebrities who are trying to make a bold fashion statement. It has also inspired an entirely new trend altogether – the temporary metallic tattoos that became all the rage at the end of last year. I’ve noticed that Vanessa Hudgens, a personal style icon, has been experimenting with henna designs for a while now. I have to say that I am pretty impressed with her handiwork!

The Sari

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To my mind, the sari is one of the sexiest outfits in existence today. A long kept secret in India, the sari has now made its way across the borders and into the hearts of fashion buffs across the world. No matter how you drape it, this six yards of cloth scream elegance like nothing else. Is it any surprise that Hollywood Stars and Celebrities have worn it? I hope to see more women rocking this sultry outfit on the red carpet in 2015.

javed43

cropped-shama4.jpg

Another day passes peacefully in the life of Shama Hussain. Now, since she knows that humble souls are right behind her backing her to the finish, twinkle in her eyes has come back. She is more determined than ever before to stay alive and beat the inevitable.

Thanks to everybody out there who is backing her. Let the light in her life keep glowing for ever........... Thanks Guys

Understanding Breast Cancer -- the Basics

What Is Breast Cancer?

Before discussing breast cancer, it's important to be familiar with the anatomy of the breast. The normal breast consists of milk-producing glands that are connected to the surface of the skin at the nipple by narrow ducts. The glands and ducts are supported by connective tissue made up of fat and fibrous material. Blood vessels, nerves, and lymphatic channels to the lymph nodes make up most of the rest of the breast tissue. This breast anatomy sits under the skin and on top of the chest muscles. As in all forms of cancer, the abnormal tissue that makes up breast cancer is the patient's own cells that have multiplied uncontrollably. Those cells may also travel to locations in the body where they are not normally found. When that happens, the cancer is called metastatic. Breast cancer develops in the breast tissue, primarily in the milk ducts (ductal carcinoma) or glands (lobular carcinoma). The cancer is still called and treated as breast cancer even if it is first discovered after the cells have travelled to other areas of the body. In those cases, the cancer is referred to as metastatic or advanced breast cancer.

Breast cancer usually begins with the formation of a small, confined tumor (lump), or as calcium deposits (microcalcifications) and then spreads through channels within the breast to the lymph nodes or through the blood stream to other organs. The tumor may grow and invade tissue around the breast, such as the skin or chest wall. Different types of breast cancer grow and spread at different rates -- some take years to spread beyond the breast while others grow and spread quickly. Some lumps are benign (not cancerous), however these can be premalignant. The only safe way to distinguish between a benign lump and cancer is to have the tissue examined by a doctor through a biopsy.

Men can get breast cancer, too, but they account for just one percent of all breast cancer cases. Among women, breast cancer is the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer deaths after lung cancer. If eight women were to live to be at least 85, one of them would be expected to develop the disease at some point during her life. Two-thirds of women with breast cancer are over 50, and most of the rest are between 39 and 49. Fortunately, breast cancer is very treatable if detected early. Localized tumors can usually be treated successfully before the cancer spreads; and in nine out of 10 cases, the woman will live at least another five years. However, late recurrences of breast cancer are common. Once the cancer begins to spread, treatment becomes difficult, although treatment can often control the disease for years. Improved screening procedures and treatment options mean that at least seven out of 10 women with breast cancer will survive more than five years after initial diagnosis and half will survive more than 10 years.

What Causes Breast Cancer?

Although the precise causes of breast cancer are unclear, we know what the main risk factors are. Still, most women considered at high risk for breast cancer do not get it. On the other hand, 75% of women who develop breast cancer have no known risk factors. Among the most significant factors are advancing age and family history. Risk increases slightly for a woman who has certain benign breast lumps and increases significantly for a woman who has previously had breast cancer or endometrial, ovarian, or colon cancer.

A woman whose mother, sister, or daughter has had breast cancer is two to three times more likely to develop the disease, particularly if more than one first-degree relative has been affected. This is especially true if the cancer developed in the woman while she was premenopausal, or if the cancer developed in both breasts. Researchers have now identified two genes responsible for some instances of familial breast cancer -- BRCA1 and BRCA2. About one woman in 200 carries one of these genes. Having a BRCA 1 or BRCA 2 gene predisposes a woman to breast cancer and -- while it does not ensure that she will get breast cancer -- her lifetime risk is 56%-85%. These genes also predispose to ovarian cancer and are associated with pancreas cancer, melanoma, and male breast cancer (BRCA2).

Because of these risks, prevention strategies and screening guidelines for those with the BRCA genes are more aggressive. There are other genes that have been identified as increasing the risk of breast cancer, including the PTEN gene, the ATM gene, the TP53 gene, and the CHEK2 gene. However, these genes carry a lower risk for breast cancer development than the BRCA genes. Generally, women over 50 are more likely to get breast cancer than younger women. A link between breast cancer and hormones is gradually becoming clearer. Researchers think that the greater a woman's exposure to the hormone estrogen, the more susceptible she is to breast cancer. Estrogen tells cells to divide; the more the cells divide, the more likely they are to be abnormal in some way, potentially becoming cancerous.

A woman's exposure to estrogen and progesterone rises and falls during her lifetime. This is influenced by the age she starts menstruating (menarche) and stops menstruating (menopause), the average length of her menstrual cycle, and her age at first childbirth. A woman's risk for breast cancer is increased if she starts menstruating before age 12 (less than 2 times the risk), has her first child after 30, stops menstruating after 55, or does not breast feed. Current information about the effect of birth control pills and breast cancer risk is mixed. Some studies have found that the hormones in birth control pills probably do not increase breast cancer risk or protect against breast cancer. However other studies suggest that the risk of breast cancer is increased in women who have taken birth control pills recently, regardless of how long she has taken them. Some studies suggest that the use of hormone replacement therapy with combined estrogen and progesterone containing compounds increases the risk of developing breast cancers. They also show, after a 7 year follow up, that the use of estrogens alone does not increase or decrease the risk of breast cancer development. Their use may, though, increase the risk of clotting. High doses of radiation, such as with nuclear exposure, or therapeutic radiation, such as used for Hodgkin lymphoma, are a factor for breast cancer development after 15-20 years. Mammography poses almost no risk of breast cancer development.

The link between diet and breast cancer has been debated. Obesity is a noteworthy risk factor, predominately in postmenopausal women, because obesity alters a woman's estrogen metabolism. Drinking alcohol regularly -- particularly more than one drink a day -- also increases the risk of breast cancer. Many studies have shown that women whose diets are high in fat, either from red meat or high-fat dairy products, are more likely to get the disease. Researchers suspect that if a woman lowers her daily calories from fat -- to less than 20-30 percent -- her diet may help protect her from developing breast cancer.

(This Blog has been assembled with content help from WebMD. The sole aim of this Blog is to create an awareness among masses about different kinds of Cancer. I am committed to this act because my wife is a Breast Cancer Patient and I want to help / guide the masses to fight against this deadly disease).

Hormone Receptors in Advanced Breast Cancer

 

The hormones in the body that launches you into puberty and control the monthly period can play a role in breast cancer.

Most breast cancers -- about 2 out of every 3 -- are sensitive to the hormones estrogen or progesterone. These tumors have a sort of biological on-off switch called a hormone receptor. Estrogen and progesterone can flip these switches "on" and quicken the cancer cells' growth. Your doctor will test your cancer to see if it has hormone receptors. If it does, she may call it "hormone-receptor positive" or “ER-positive” or “PR-positive.”

For advanced breast cancer, the doctor may want to repeat these tests after a while to see if the cancer has changed. It may respond differently to hormones than before. Test results will help the doctor to find the best treatment at any stage.

Compared with other types of breast cancer, hormone-receptor-positive breast cancers, called HR-positive cancers, tend to:

  • Grow more slowly
  • Respond better to hormone therapy
  • Have a better outlook (prognosis)

What Is HER2-Positive Breast Cancer?

About 20% to 25% of breast cancers are HER2-positive. That means they have a certain protein (HER2/neu) that makes cancer cells grow. This kind of cancer tends to be much more aggressive and fast-growing than other kinds of breast cancer, but there are effective treatments that target HER2.

The doctor will test the cancer to find out if it is HER2-positive and also check on whether it has spread and if it's sensitive to hormones.

Causes

Researchers aren't sure what causes breast cancer. They think it may be a combination of things, including your genes, your environment, and your lifestyle. Every case is different.

In HER2-positive breast cancer, a gene causes cancer cells to make too much HER2/neu protein. When that happens, cancer cells grow in an out-of-control way.

This only happens in cancer cells. It can happen in other cancers, too -- not just breast cancer.

You can't inherit a bad copy of this gene from a parent or pass it on to your children.

Symptoms

The most common symptom of any type of breast cancer is a lump in your breast that feels different from the area around it.

Other symptoms include:

  • Breast swelling or a change in the shape of the breast
  • Skin irritation or dimpling
  • Pain in the breast or nipple
  • Redness or thickness of the nipple or breast skin
  • Discharge from the nipple (not breast milk)

You may have noticed a difference in your breasts during a self-exam, or you may have had a mammogram that showed the cancer.

Getting a Diagnosis

When you're diagnosed with breast cancer, your doctor will test for HER2. There are four types of tests for HER2-positive breast cancer.

The IHC test (immunohistochemistry) checks for how much HER2 protein is in a sample of breast cancer tissue.

Three other tests check to see if there are too many HER2 genes in the cancer cells:

  1. FISH test (fluorescence in-situ hybridization)
  2. SPOT-Light HER2 CISH test (subtraction probe technology chromogenic in-situ hybridization)
  3. Inform HER2 Dual ISH test (inform dual in-situ hybridization)

Treatment

Breast cancers aren't all the same. It's important to find out if your breast cancer is HER2-positive because it makes a difference in how you treat it.

HER2-positive cancer doesn't respond well to just hormone treatment that is used for some breast cancers. But there are drugs that target the HER2 protein and greatly lower the risk of the cancer coming back. These drugs kill cancer cells that are making the HER2 protein. They are called targeted treatments, and in the case in of HER2-positive cancer, they stop or block the HER2 protein from helping cancer cells grow.

Taking Care of Yourself

Having breast cancer can be overwhelming. Remember that you're in control of your treatment decisions and how you live your life.

These tips can help you stay healthy while you get treatment:

  • Get the support you need, whether it's information about breast cancer, talking with someone, or practical help with daily tasks. It can all make a huge difference in how you feel. The people in your life will want to help, so let them know what you would like.
  • Listen to your body. Exercise can help you feel better, but only when you're up for it.
  • If you don’t have much appetite, try eating smaller meals every few hours, rather than big meals.

What to Expect

Although HER2-positive breast cancer tends to grow and spread faster than other kinds of breast cancer, many women respond very well to targeted treatments. Work with your doctor and health care team to develop the best treatment program for you.

Breast cancer of any kind is easier to treat when it is caught early. But even if your breast cancer has spread or has come back, there are still ways to treat it. Each case is different.

(This Blog has been assembled with content help from WebMD. The sole aim of this Blog is to create an awareness among masses about different kinds of Cancer. I am committed to this act because my wife is a Breast Cancer Patient and I want to help / guide the masses to fight against this deadly disease).